Articles & Podcasts

Beyond Academia

The dissemination and interpretation of research outside academia is, or at least should be, high on the agenda of any academic researcher. For those of us working in early modern and medieval studies, sharing our research with a wider audience has some rather specific ups and downs. Interest in the period is rarely lacking: people…

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Private Prayer: the Common Man’s Creative Writing?

Imagine a society where every single adult was trained in – and practised – composing short original texts, every single day. At the turn of the seventeenth century, changes in writing private prayers underlay major developments in drama. Required to pray independently, convinced their private prayers had an impact on the course of events, the…

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The Life and Adventures of Meredith Hanmer, Anglican Divine

The project ‘Meredith Hanmer’, carried out at the University of Sussex, School of English (November 2014-November 2016) received funding from the Marie Curie Actions of the European Union FP7 as a project to reconstruct the life of this familiar yet elusive figure of early modern England.1 An Anglican divine of the Church of England, with…

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‘To His Grace the Duke of Shrewsbury’ by Matthew Prior (1713)

Matthew Prior’s diplomatic negotiations with France in the period 1711–15 were the most important and worst rewarded of his career. From 1711 the English career-diplomat and poet acted as secret negotiator for the Tory government with enemy France. His journeys and talks were part of wider negotiations that ultimately led to peace and the Treaty…

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Between the University and the Museum: The View from the V & A

A few months ago, I attended a symposium organized by my old friend Peter Miller, now Dean of the Bard Graduate Center in New York. It celebrated 20 years of that institution’s innovative programme on the history of decorative arts and material culture. The speakers included academics from various fields and curators from museums on…

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The Culture of Early Modern Sussex

‘The Culture of Early Modern Sussex’, a HEIF-funded project, intends to challenge assumptions about the county, demonstrating both the strangeness of Sussex and its importance in the period 1500 – 1700.  Through a series of public events in the Spring and early Summer of 2015 – including two exhibitions, a number of public lectures, and…

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Veronese: Magnificence in Renaissance Venice

Extraordinarily, despite his ongoing popularity (tesitified by the amount of his work in the National Gallery’s own collection), there has never yet been a monographic show on Paolo Veronese in England. This is a striking omission that has been handsomely corrected in the National Gallery Exhibition, which ran from 19 March until 15 June 2014….

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The Renaissance of Tobacco: A New Drug from the Old World

When I was invited to a Christmas party last year, I was requested to “dress smartly and don’t bring any cider!”. Yet, even without this warning, good manners  would have dictated that I leave the four-pack of Scrumpy Jack at the back of my fridge. For me, however, the incident also posed the question: why…

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A Gateway into Renaissance Genoa

Standing at a busy crossroads, at rush hour, I looked up at the towering magnificence of Genoa’s Medieval Porta Soprana. This  fleeting glimpse, before the traffic lights changed and the roar of the contemporary city struck up again, impressed me with a sense  of the power, protection and wealth of this Republic, dubbed ‘the Proud’….

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Translating for the Commonwealth

One striking development in Renaissance studies over the last five years has been the surge of interest in the theory and practice of translation. This has been evident not just in the number of conferences and books on the subject, including the publication of volume 2 (1550-1660) in the admirable Oxford History of Literary Translation…

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